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About us

The Oxford Parkinson's Disease Centre (OPDC) is a unique multidisciplinary research centre at the University of Oxford supported by Parkinson’s UK with funds from The Monument Trust, one of the Sainsbury Family Charitable Trusts.

Established in February 2010, the Oxford Parkinson’s Disease Centre (OPDC) brings together internationally-renowned scientists who work on the genetics of Parkinson’s, the generation of cell and animal models, and the wiring of brain circuits which control movement, with clinical experts in the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s.

Our world-class research centre was formed to understand the earliest events in the development of Parkinson’s and create animal models with greater relevance to the disease, ultimately with a view to identifying the changes which occur before the symptoms become apparent.

Our programme targets the molecular pathways to Parkinson’s in order to:

  1. Understand the progression of Parkinson’s
  2. Predict the onset of Parkinson’s
  3. Identify potential drug targets for Parkinson’s
  4. Develop new treatments that will prevent the development of Parkinson’s in at-risk individuals.
  • Watch the video below to learn more about OPDC's research

 

Selected Publications

News

Inside the Wade-Martins lab

Inside the Wade-Martins lab

Posted 11/04/2019

This week Oxford University's Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics is marking World Parkinson's Day, which takes place on Thursday 11 April 2019, with an inside look into the Wade-Martins Laboratory. The Wade-Martins Group conducts critical research into several neurodegenerative diseases, and makes up part of the OPDC with its work into Parkinson's, with the aim to understand the molecular mechanisms of these disorders and help ...


OPDC study finds mutations in the gene LRRK2 affect normal cell function.

OPDC study finds mutations in the gene LRRK2 affect normal cell function.

Posted 11/04/2019

A new study from OPDC Career Development Fellow Natalie Connor-Robson investigates how mutations in the gene LRRK2, which are known to cause Parkinson’s, effect normal cell function. We generated dopaminergic neurons, the cells that are affected in Parkinson’s, from stem cells reprogrammed using skin samples donated by people with Parkinson’s who carry LRRK2 mutations. These neurons were used for in depth analysis which showed the most altered ...


OPDC research featured in OxfordAI videos

OPDC research featured in OxfordAI videos

Posted 21/12/2018

The videos focus on two of our projects to use new technology to better understand the progression of Parkinson's. The first highlights our sleep study which aims to make it possible to monitor sleep in the home using wearable devices. The second features our smartphone app which monitors different motor symptoms of Parkinson's to improve our understanding of Parkinson's and help us improve treatments.    

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Seminars/Events

Mart Saarma 14 May 2019

Mart Saarma 14 May 2019

Posted 21/11/2018

Unconventional Endoplasmic Reticulum Located Trophic Factor for Parkinson’s Disease Mart Saarma's work has focused on the in vivo roles, therapeutic effects and receptors of the neurotrophic factors including GDNF and the novel neurotrophic factor CDNF discovered by his research group. They have shown that CDNF very efficiently protects and repairs dopamine neurons in vivo. Prof. Saarma’s work has been instrumental in understanding the ...

Sonia Gandhi Jun 12 2019

Sonia Gandhi Jun 12 2019

Posted 18/12/2018

Wednesday 12th June, 2019, 4-5pm, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor, Sherrington Building Clinical and Movement NeurosciencesUCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology Group Leader Sonia Gandhi has expertise in the process of protein misfolding, in which smaller proteins, monomers, joining together to form larger proteins, oligomers, and how this process may drive organellar dysfunction and cell toxicity in neurodegeneration. Sonia obtained a BA ...

 

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