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About us

The Oxford Parkinson's Disease Centre (OPDC) is a unique multidisciplinary research centre at the University of Oxford supported by Parkinson’s UK with funds from The Monument Trust, one of the Sainsbury Family Charitable Trusts.

Established in February 2010, the Oxford Parkinson’s Disease Centre (OPDC) brings together internationally-renowned scientists who work on the genetics of Parkinson’s, the generation of cell and animal models, and the wiring of brain circuits which control movement, with clinical experts in the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s.

Our world-class research centre was formed to understand the earliest events in the development of Parkinson’s and create animal models with greater relevance to the disease, ultimately with a view to identifying the changes which occur before the symptoms become apparent.

Our programme targets the molecular pathways to Parkinson’s in order to:

  1. Understand the progression of Parkinson’s
  2. Predict the onset of Parkinson’s
  3. Identify potential drug targets for Parkinson’s
  4. Develop new treatments that will prevent the development of Parkinson’s in at-risk individuals.
Watch the video below to see OPDC's Michele Hu talk about our research at Parkinson's UK's Bespoke Treatment Lectures at the Royal Institution.

 

Selected Publications

News

'Parkinson's: The Funny Side' on BBC One

'Parkinson's: The Funny Side' on BBC One

Posted 25/04/2016

  The Inside Out special, 'Parkinson's: The Funny Side', which was shown on BBC One on Monday 7th March and Wednesday 20th April is now available to view on iPlayer until 20th May 2016. Paul Mayhew-Archer, one of the writers of Mrs Brown's Boys and The Vicar of Dibley, who was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease five years ago, decided to find out what was being done to develop treatments. In the last few months, Paul has visited the OPDC to ...

Dopamine nerve cells pause to signal movement

Dopamine nerve cells pause to signal movement

Posted 31/03/2016

Movement problems in Parkinson’s disease arise when brain nerve cells releasing the signaling chemical dopamine stop working properly and die. Exactly how dopamine-releasing nerve cells control movement, and how their activity might be disturbed well before their death in disease, are unknown. To address these key issues, Paul Dodson and colleagues at the MRC Brain Network Dynamics Unit and Oxford Parkinson’s Disease Centre recorded the electrica ...

Gut Feelings About α-Synuclein in Gastrointestinal Biopsies

Gut Feelings About α-Synuclein in Gastrointestinal Biopsies

Posted 31/03/2016

A reliable biomarker for the early and definitive diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease is currently missing. This would ideally come from biological samples that are easy to obtain, such as blood or gut, and be consistently reproducible. Using these biomarkers in clinical trials would fast-track the development of a long awaited cure for Parkinson’s. Following recent reports in the scientific literature, we are currently investigating detection of th ...

OPDC featured on BBC One

OPDC featured on BBC One

Posted 07/03/2016

After being diagnosed with Parkinson's disease five years ago, Paul Mayhew-Archer one of the writers of Mrs Brown's Boys and The Vicar of Dibley, decided to find out what was being done to develop treatments. In the last few months, Paul has visited the OPDC to find out about our research where we aim to understand the molecular pathways of Parkinson's disease. On Saturday 5th March 2016, Paul visited BBC One Saturday Breakfast News to promote ...

Seminars/Events

Valerio Zerbi Seminar: 10th May

Valerio Zerbi Seminar: 10th May

Posted 05/04/2016

Seminar Title: 'The structural basis of large-scale functional connectivity in the mouse' Valerio Zerbi got his masters degree in Biomedical Engineering (2008) at the Politecnico of Milano, Italy. Thereafter he moved to the Netherlands, where he successfully obtained a PhD in Medical Sciences (2013) at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, as well as the diploma at the Donders Graduate School for Cognitive Neuroscience. I ...

Jia-Yi Li Seminar - 21st June

Jia-Yi Li Seminar - 21st June

Posted 06/04/2016

Seminar Title: 'Prion-like pathology propagation in Parkinson’s disease: the present standing'   Professor Li received his medical degree in China in 1982, and his PhD in neurobiology at Gothenburg University in 1995. After completing postdoctoral training, he accepted a position as associate professor at Wallenberg Neuroscience Center, Lund University in 2001. Since then he has focused on studying pathogenetic mechanisms of neurodegenerati ...

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